What does Rosso di Toscana IGT mean?

sangiovese grapes

Above: The Sangiovese grape is the quintessential red variety of Italy. It’s grown all over the country, from the farthest points north to the island of Sicily. But the best Sangiovese wines come from Tuscany, where Mazzoni Rosso di Toscana is made.

The literal translation of “Rosso di Toscana” is “red [wine] from Tuscany.”

“IGT” on the other hand is an acronym for indicazione geografica tipica, which rendered in English, means “typical geographic indication.”

“Rosso di Toscana IGT” is the name of an appellation.

What’s an appellation?

An appellation is a designation or name given to specific wine producing area. Not only does it denote a geographic area, but it also lays out the grapes and winemaking methods that can be used in that area.

In this case, the Rosso di Toscana IGT covers the entire region of Tuscany, where some of Italy’s most famous wines are made.

The Rosso di Toscana IGT was created many years ago for wines that were made in Tuscany but that didn’t belong to a given appellation.

For example, Brunello di Montalcino must be made with 100 percent Sangiovese grapes.

If you live in Montalcino (the village where both Brunello di Montalcino and Mazzoni Rosso di Toscana IGT are made) and you want to make a wine that has grapes other than Sangiovese in it, you can’t call it Brunello di Montalcino but you can call it Rosso di Toscana IGT.

And that’s exactly what the winemaker at Mazzoni, Alessandro Bindocci, did.

Because he wanted to make a blend of Sangiovese and Merlot, he called it a Rosso di Toscana IGT.

The Sangiovese — Italy’s most important red grape — gives the wine its zing and its brilliant fruit notes. The Merlot gives it a smooth texture, rich color, and depth of flavor.

It’s a perfect balance of what the two grapes have to offer.

And it’s a Rosso di Toscana IGT!

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