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Polpette Recipe: An Update to Italian Meatballs

Meatballs are served as a main dish or in soups all throughout Italy. Almost every country in the world has their own version of a meatballItalian-Americans created their own main dish of meatballs served with spaghetti, which is something I had never seen before in Italy.
With this recipe, I remembered how much I loved these little treats that Mama used to make for me when I was a boy, so I wanted to create something with a little surprise in the middle, that would be fun and delicious for both kids and adults.

Francesco

Panfried meatballs are an Italian classic made with beef and/or pork, with Pecorino Romano, parsley and garlic and breadcrumbs. With this recipe, I made them into small oval shapes and filled them with fresh mozzarella, so when you bite into them, they ooze out with the creamy cheese. Served with an arugula and tomato salad, it’s a perfect Italian dinner that your whole family will love. If you are having a cocktail party, you can pierce each little polpette with a small skewer and serve them as a bite size appetizer. Enjoy this delicious and versatile staple of Italian cuisine.

Buon Appetito!

Francesco 2

Francesco 3

Polpette

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cooking time: 20 minutes

Serve with: Mazzoni Rosso di Toscana

Ingredients:
  1. 1 pound ground beef
  2. 1 clove garlic minced
  3. 2 cups of grated Pecorino-Romano cheese
  4. 1 cup fresh Italian parsley, chopped
  5. 1/2 cup bread crumbs
  6. 1 egg
  7. 1 tsp kosher salt
  8. 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  9. 4 Tbs Extra-Virgin olive oil
  10. 1 cup Mozzarella cheese, cubed
Instructions:
  1. In a large bowl, thoroughly combine all the ingredients above except for the olive oil and mozzarella.
  2. Using your hands, roll the meat into golf ball sized meatballs. With your finger make a hole in the center and place a cube of mozzarella.
  3. Cover the cheese with the remaining meat, and shape into an oval.
  4. Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan.
  5. Fry the meatball for about 3 minutes on each side. Until meatballs are golden brown.
  6. Drain on a paper towel and serve warm.

Note: Eat them while they’re hot! 

 

Francesco Influenced by memories in the kitchen with his mother and grandmother, Italian-born Francesco Romano is the man behind the food blog, Coco de Mama. He shares recipes and culinary knowledge with Mazzoni fans each month.

10 Italian New Year’s Resolutions to Make in 2016

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  1. Make pasta by hand: A true cornerstone of the Italian diet, fresh pasta does not have to be intimidating or require special machinery. All you need is some water and flour, plus enough patience to pull and push until the dough is just-right-sticky.  Grab a rolling pin or even a bottle of wine to flatten the dough and cut with a knife.  Congratulations- that is casarecce: homemade, free-form pasta! In 2016, conquer this kitchen staple.
  2. Toast to a Tuesday: Italian living is about enjoyment, not excess. Rather than saving up all those lovely bottles for a special occasion, pop one open for lunch.  Italian meals almost always feature a glass of wine, to help with digestion of course! There is no reason not to raise a glass, savor the little things, and toast to a regular Tuesday. Cin cin!
  3. Break out your fancy underwear: On New Years Eve in Italy, it’s traditional to wear new red underwear for good luck. Italy gave the world famous lingerie brands such as La Perla, so luxury underthings remain in style beyond December 31st. This is the year to ban the boring briefs.
  4. Speak your mind: Everyone has an opinion, and Italians are not shy about sharing them. If you are making your tomato sauce wrong or wearing too few clothes on a brisk day, your neighborhood nonna will be sure to let you know. In 2016, express your self with confidence.
  5. Call your mother more often: Put that new iPhone to use and ring mama. Staying connected to family and friends is one of the best ways to start off 2016 on the right foot.
  6. Explore your hometown: You don’t have to hop on a plane every time the travel bug bites. Italians are embracing slow travel and staycations and you can resolve to do the same this year.  Imagine the familiar streets with new eyes and seek out the hidden gems in your own hometown.
  7. Start an herb garden: You don’t need a green thumb to add a bit of spice to the kitchen. Hearty herbs like basil can be grown on any windowsill through spring and summer. Plan to create a small kitchen herb garden to add fresh homegrown Italian flavors to any dish you whip up in the coming months.
  8. Save electricity, save the world: You would be hard pressed to find an Italian home with a dryer. Electricity is too expensive, making fancy clothes dryers a luxury that most Italians skip.  Cut down your bill and embrace green living by doing laundry the Italian way: hang it out!
  9. Dress up the dog: Man’s best friend is truly a part of the family, so why should puppies be left out when it comes to fashion? Doggy sweaters, boots and raincoats are all in heavy rotation in Italy during the colder months. Resolve to take the dog on more walks (in his new puppy outfit).
  10. Make your house a home: Home is a sanctuary and a place to welcome friends and family throughout the year. Most Italian homes are brimming with personality to mark the space.  Make a resolution to add small touches that will transform even the most basic apartment into a refuge to enjoy every day of 2016.

 

181231_636233323070687_1494790961_n Natalie moved from California to Italy in 2010, and is the writer behind the blog, An American in Rome. She provides accessible Italian lifestyle tidbits each month for the Mazzoni Wines blog, Live Like an Italian.

How to Make Italian Street Food: Panzerotti

Panzerotti: one of the most delightful Italian street foods

Coming from the regions of Basilicata and Puglia, Panzerotti are fried dough filled with simple ingredients. When the yeast-dough hits the oil, they puff up and quickly cook whatever delicious ingredients you have filled them with. You can make them larger and serve them as a nice lunch, or as I show you below, they can be made into small, appetizer sizes and filled with the traditional tomato and mozzarella (called Panzerotto Materano). Adults and children alike will devour these delicious bites. Get out your rolling pin and let’s get started!

Francesco

Panzerotti

Ingredients:

For dough:

1 pound all purpose flour

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 cups lukewarm water

1/2 teaspoon sugar

1/2 teaspoon fresh yeast

Grapeseed oil for frying

For Filling:

1 can San Marzano Tomatoes, crushed by hand

1 ball fresh Mozzarella

Fresh basil leaves

Directions:

Dissolve the sugar and yeast in 1/2 cup of lukewarm water.

Add the salt to a 1/2 cup of warm water.

Sift the flour in a large bowl.

Add the salt water and yeast mixture to the flour and combine until the mixture turns to a soft ball.

Add the olive oil and mix well.

Transfer the dough to lightly floured board and knead for about 5 minutes until the dough is smooth and elastic.

Divide the dough into about 20 balls and place them onto baking sheets, leaving generous space around each.

Cover the trays with a clean cotton towel and set in a warm place to rise for about 2 hours, or until they double in size.

Gently flatten each ball into a 5-inch circle. Place some tomato, mozzarella and a basil leaf (or other ingredients of your choice) into the center of the circle.

Season with salt and pepper and brush the edges with water.

Fold each one over and seal the edges together and eliminate excess dough with a dough cutter. Repeat with the remaining balls and filling.

Heat the grapeseed oil in a deep fryer or deep saucepan to 350°. Place a one or two panzerottini into the oil in batches and fry for 2-3 minutes on each side, until both sides are golden brown. Drain on paper towel and serve immediately.

 

FrancescoInfluenced by memories in the kitchen with his mother and grandmother, Italian-born Francesco Romano is the man behind the food blog, Coco de Mama. He shares recipes and culinary knowledge with Mazzoni fans each month.

What’s the Perfect Everyday Wine?

Just like every wise home cook has a collection of essentials in their pantry to use for a quick and satisfying meal, every smart wine lover should have a well-stocked inventory of wine bottles. Whether it’s to aid you during a bad case of the Mondays, alongside a take out dinner, or with last-minute company, every household has a need for an everyday wine. I am always prepared, with a generous stash of perfect wines for any and all occasions.

There are wines that have a place in every home, and Mazzoni’s Piemonte Barbera is one of them. Need a wine to pair with the delivery pizza you just ordered? Or a pleasurable bottle to bring with you to a friend’s house? How about a wine to enjoy as you’re busy catching up on all your TV shows? Grab a bottle of Mazzoni Piemonte Barbera from your collection and you’re good to go.

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I recently added the newest release, the 2012 Mazzoni Piemonte Barbera, to the list of wines I hoard several of at a time to save me during those everyday emergencies. Made completely with barbera grapes from Italy’s Piemonte region, the wine is full of elegant aromas of black cherries and dried flowers, with raspberry tart flavors. It’s a juicy and extremely gulpable wine — in the very best way. Its mild tannins and bright acidity make it an excellent match with a range of foods, too. This is an excellent wine for pizza night, with grilled meats, or even just by itself on a Tuesday night.

It’s fitting that one of my favorite everyday red wines is made from Barbera. In Piemonte, the wine region that Barbera calls home, it’s often referred to as “the people’s wine.” Unlike the Barolo and Barberesco wines made from Nebbiolo in the same region that are saved for special occasions, Barbera is affordable and an everyday sensation. In my experience, I’ve found the best Barbera comes from Asti (located in the Piemonte region), which is where Mazzoni grows their Barbera for this wine. You can taste the quality of the grapes upon first sip of the wine, and its elegance lasts until the very last drop.

If you haven’t already established a small collection of wine at home, get started. And if you love Barbera as much as I do, perhaps consider buying a whole case. I promise you’ll find plenty of reasons in your everyday life to uncork a bottle.

The Ultimate Gift Guide for the Italophile in your Life

Ah, the holidays.

As the end of the year and the festive season approaches, December is the perfect time to gather around the people that are dear to us.  If one of those people in your life loves Italy, well, we have the perfect tips on how to surprise them with a small gift from the bel paese.

1. Moleskine:

The choice of Hemingway (an Italy-lover himself), these small notebooks are now manufactured by a publishing house in Milan. High quality, ageless design and lightweight, these books are perfecting for jotting down to do lists, daydreams and trip itineraries.

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via Moleskine  

2. Moka Pot

A great Italian coffee does not require a plane ticket to Rome, or even a fancy espresso maker. All you need are some good beans, a few instructions and a classic stovetop coffee pot that is found in every Italian home. The most trusted is Bialetti, and this small gift can deliver great espresso for years to come.

DSCF0873

via Natalie Rae

3. Passport holder:

What better way to get excited for future travels than a beautiful passport holder? The dual purpose holders can protect documents while pretty-ing up a necessary piece of identification. There are hundreds of designs out there for any personality, but our favorites are timeless and made of Italian leather, of course.

Passport holder

via Gigi New York

4. Classic stemware:

Add a touch of sophistication to annual gift giving with wine glasses that can be used and treasured for years to come. For a made in Italy touch, check out the glasses from Luigi Bormioli, which offers stemware that will enhance the full flavors of your Italian wine.

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via Luigi Bormioli

5. Biscotti cookbook:

With so many occasions calling for a special treat in the coming weeks, biscotti recipes straight from Rome can come in handy. This lovely little cookbook shares the history of Italian cookies, with well-tested recipes that can be recreated in any kitchen.  These biscotti go well with everything from morning coffee to nightcaps.

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via Amazon.com

6. Lemon zester:

If it is already getting cold outside, simply imagine summer on the Amalfi Coast, with vibrant blue waters and hills covered in trees weighed down by citrus flowers. You can bring the taste of Amalfi anywhere with a simple lemon zester. Perfect for cakes, cookies, and even pasta, a bit of zest adds a new brightness to the winter holidays.

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via Amazon.com

7. Vintage map of Venice:

There are always new designers, artists and creative foodies innovating in Italy, but some things never change. The perfect example? Venice. This unique city is so hemmed in by canals that the streets have not changed in hundreds of years. A vintage map can be an inspiring piece of home décor, but it can double as a nearly usable map on your next trip!

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via BlueMonaclePrints

8. Taralli:

What goes perfectly with any glass of wine? Taralli. These simple snacks are served across Italy to tide you over before dinner.  They make an authentic and delicious hostess gift, and will keep crowds happy while you open another bottle of wine and put the finishes touches on your holiday feast.

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via Amazon.com

Happy Holidays!

 

181231_636233323070687_1494790961_n Natalie moved from California to Italy in 2010, and is the writer behind the blog, An American in Rome. She provides accessible Italian lifestyle tidbits each month for the Mazzoni Wines blog, Live Like an Italian.

Drinking White After Labor Day

After a long and exceptionally hot summer, I’ve been welcoming this crisp autumn air and embracing the flavors of fall’s bounty. I’ve willingly stored my flip-flops and bathing suits away until next year, but there’s one summery thing I refuse to give up: drinking white wine. I know wearing white after Labor Day can be considered a major faux pas, but there’s no reason you shouldn’t still be drinking white wines.

Mazzoni-PinotGrigio2014-p19lmeuekg1irv1ddj10qk160lep6There are plenty of white wines that are more than fit for fall. At this time of year, I often look for whites with bigger body and texture, and sometimes prefer whites with ripe flavors of orchard fruits like apple, pear, or quince. The Mazzoni Pinot Grigio meets all these requirements. Light straw yellow in the glass, it’s full of ripe pear aromas and full flavors, with refreshing acidity on the finish. It’s a pleasurable and fresh wine, certainly more complex than most pinot grigios I’ve tasted in the past.

This is the first year I’ve signed up for a fall CSA, which stands for Community-Supported Agriculture, and is basically a weekly seasonal share of local produce. Each week, as I head to pick up my share, I have no idea what’s going to be inside it. I’ve so far enjoyed the challenge of preparing my weekly meals based on what I’m given every week, but sometimes I get thrown a curveball — a vegetable or herb I’ve never cooked with or eaten. Perhaps a fruit I’ve never baked with before.

Earlier this month, a mysterious looking vegetable appeared in my CSA share. It was kohlrabi, an alien-looking root vegetable, something I would have never bought for myself at a grocery store. After a few minutes of researching online and paging through cookbooks, I found a recipe for kohlrabi risotto. I already had most of the ingredients required — kohlrabi, Arborio rice, Parmigiano-Reggiano, onion, chicken stock, and most importantly, white wine — so decided to make it for the first time for dinner.

Shelby

Now, making risotto is no easy task. It requires a little bit of love and a lot of patience. But there are rewards should you choose to invest your time in the process. The recipe I followed, like most risotto recipes, required wine. To be exact, I needed a ½ cup of dry, white wine. Luckily, I had an unopened bottle of Mazzoni Pinot Grigio in my fridge to use. Yes, I used a half-cup of a beautiful wine to cook with. But trust me, if you don’t like a wine enough to drink it, you shouldn’t cook with it. Don’t you want the same balance and liveliness on your plate as you have in your glass? I know I do.

Another bonus of cooking risotto is the remainder of the bottle of wine you get to drink. As I carefully tended to the pan of risotto on my stove, I sipped on a glass of Mazzoni Pinot Grigio and snacked on bites of Parmigiano-Reggiano. The final result was just as pleasant as the process of preparing it.

Shelby VittekShelby Vittek is an award-winning food, wine, and travel writer, and a current contributor at Terroirist.com. She provides accessible, approachable wine reviews for Live Like An Italian.

Italian Recipe: Pork Tenderloin with Roasted Peppers and Tarragon

Roasted bell peppers are a staple in Italian cooking, and are at their most flavorful from July through November. I was reading an article by Russ Parsons of the Los Angeles Times, about how to choose the best bell peppers, which inspired me to create this recipe. I used his suggestions and went to the farmer’s market to find the perfect bell peppers to roast.

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While there, I asked the butcher for a pork tenderloin to go with my peppers. Most people associate pork with apples, but instead I thought a nice and flavorful accompaniment would be to make a roasted gold and red pepper sauce. I grabbed some fresh tarragon and found some imported Sicilian pistachios and I was on my way back to the kitchen to create this recipe. The aroma of roasting peppers and blending them with fresh tarragon will infuse your house with the most delicious scent. Once again, the Italian philosophy of simplicity and using the freshest ingredients made an incredibly flavorful and beautifully colorful dish. I hope you enjoy this simple and fresh recipe and share it with your friends and family.

Buon Appetito!

Pork Tenderloin with Roasted Peppers and Tarragon

Serves 4

Prep Time: 30 min

Cook Time: 35 min

Pair with Mazzoni Rosso di Toscana

Ingredients:

For the Pepper Sauce:

2 whole bell peppers (1 red & 1 gold)

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

3 sprigs fresh tarragon

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup pistachios, lightly crushed

For the Pork:

1 1/2 pound pork tenderloin

1 teaspoon freshly cracked pepper

1 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon fresh thyme

1 teaspoon fresh rosemary

1 garlic clove, minced

Instructions:

For the Pepper Sauce:

  1. Preheat the oven to 500°. Place the roasting pan with the bell peppers on the rack.
  2. Roast, turning occasionally, until they blister and darken on all sides, about 20 to 25 minutes.
  3. Remove the peppers from the oven and place in a bowl.
  4. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and let stand for 20 minutes.
  5. When cool enough to handle, remove the skin and slice them open.
  6. Remove the seeds and discard.
  7. Place peppers and tarragon in a food processor and blend until creamy.
  8. Add salt to taste and set aside.

For the Pork:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2. Combine the garlic, rosemary, thyme, salt, pepper and olive oil in a small bowl.
  3. Rub the pork with the mixture and olive oil.
  4. Place pork tenderloin on a baking sheet and transfer to the oven.
  5. Cook until an instant-read thermometer reads 145 degrees.
  6. Remove the tenderloin to a platter, cover and let it rest for 10 minutes.
  7. Warm up the pepper-tarragon sauce.
  8. When the pork has rested, pour the sauce on top, sprinkle the pistachios and serve.

FrancescoInfluenced by memories in the kitchen with his mother and grandmother, Italian-born Francesco Romano is the man behind the food blog, Coco de Mama. He shares recipes and culinary knowledge with Mazzoni fans each month.

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